Tuesday, November 5, 2013

New Baylor University Study Finds Faith Decreases Crime and Recidivism


I have long written about my belief that employment and job-training for ex-offenders is key to lowering the recidivism rate. An even better approach combines faith with employment-based job-training like we pursue at Belay Enterprises. A new study from Baylor University shows that religious faith decreases crime and recidivism among offenders. This study provides empirical evidence of what many faith-based practitioners already know: faith is a key part of successful outcomes for ex-offenders.

Until recently there has been a lack of consensus
about the nature of this relationship between religion
and crime. Based on our exhaustive review of studies
utilizing vastly different methods, samples, and
research designs, increasing religiosity is consistently
linked with decreases in various measures of crime or
delinquency. As expected, these findings are
particularly pronounced among the more
methodologically and statistically sophisticated studies,
especially those relying upon nationally representative
samples. Put simply, increasing religiousness has
found to be associated with decreases in crime or
delinquency.

Read the Estimating the Benefits of a Faith-Based Correctional Program study by Grant Duwe and Byron Johnson here.

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